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Latest Blog Posts

  • Teaching creativity in the modern world

    Shutterstock 305285030

    In a world defined by instant gratification, parents and teachers are rightly concerned about how much time children spend using their innate creativity. What can teachers do to ensure their pupils are getting enough time – both structured and unstructured – for creativity in school?

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  • Sardinia For The Soul

    Sardinia

    Most of my travel adventures are inspired by food. I am not ashamed to admit that I have travelled to New York just to eat donuts at Dough, if you haven’t done that, go. Then there’s the time I was fascinated by roof top bars. Before I knew it, I was on route to Bangkok.

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  • It’s Different for Boys!

    Boys 2

    In March Childline launched a new campaign called ‘Tough to Talk’, backed by Wayne Rooney. The aim is to encourage boys to seek help for issues and problems. In 2015/16, Childline provided six times more counselling sessions about suicidal thoughts and feelings to girls than for boys. But the suicide rate for 10–19 year-old boys was 4.4 that year, almost 2.5 times that for girls.

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